Discovering ATCC Hematopoietic Progenitor Cells

Model Systems to Study the Immune and Cardiovascular Systems

2/19/2015


The cellular components of blood originate in bone medullary cavities. In the process of becoming fully functional, hematopoietic cells undergo a program of differentiation which begins in the marrow and may be completed in the peripheral tissues and organs such as blood, lymph, thymus, and spleen. The result is a diversity of cell types, each of which displays specific transport, hemostatic, and immune functions. Hematopoietic research tools have high value for investigating the pathogenesis of anemia and autoimmune diseases, and are useful controls in liquid tumor studies. In this webinar, ATCC scientists will discuss recent developments in developing models of hematopoiesis using immunological cells such as CD34+ bone marrow cells, CD14+ peripheral blood monocytes, and primary peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

Presenters

James Clinton, Ph.D.

James Clinton, Ph.D.,
Senior Scientist, ATCC

James Clinton, Ph.D., works in new product development, with a focus on primary cells and advanced, physiologically relevant culture systems using novel technologies. Previously he worked at University of California, San Diego and the La Jolla Institute for Molecular Medicine. Dr. Clinton attended Washington State University and University of California, San Diego where he studied Neuroscience.